Book Promo: SURE-FIRE WEIGHT REDUCTION & LONGEVITY PROGRAM

SURE-FIRE WEIGHT REDUCTION & LONGEVITY PROGRAM

by Shmarye Primack

Shmarye Primack has completed his most recent book “Sure-Fire Weight Reduction & Longevity Program”:  a true solution for life, details methods of weight loss that are recommended and taught in weight loss clinics.

Published by Fulton Books, Shmarye Primack’s book features a philosophy for healthy living spiritually, emotionally, and physically proving fruitful for anyone wanting to be morally strong and extraordinarily fulfilled.

Choose life!  Begin to live a more fulfilling and complete life!

Arlene Maletta, B.A., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. says, “As a nutritionist, I have referred to information, such as that espoused in “Sure-Fire Weight Reduction and Longevity Program” quite often. In addition, I adhere to many of the practices mentioned in this book in my own life. Combining a philosophy for healthy living spiritually, emotionally, and physically, certainly can prove fruitful for anyone wanting to be morally strong and extraordinarily fulfilled.”

“Sure-Fire Weight Reduction and Longevity Program” is a comprehensive and effective program that can help everyone to lose the weight they need to lose, keep it off and live a longer and healthier life. The methods recommended are the same as we teach our weight loss patients in our clinic.

I highly recommend “Sure-Fire Weight Reduction and Longevity Program” as the ultimate manual on the subject of weight loss andlongevity.” —Dr. Earnest C. Didde-Esteban, Ph.D., OMD, DCH, L.Ac., Dr. Pamela Rae Davis, Ph.D., OMD, DCH, L.Ac

Readers who wish to experience this life changing work can purchase“Sure-Fire Weight Reduction & Longevity Program” at bookstores everywhere, or online at the Apple iTunes store, Amazon, Google Play or Barnes and Noble.

Essentials of Living a Balanced Life

3 Reasons A Balanced Life Is A Better Life
At Work And At Home, Success Depends On Finding Equilibrium, Magazine Editor And Stroke Survivor Says

Life sometimes can seem off kilter as responsibilities mount and people plow all their physical and mental resources into what seems to be the most pressing crisis of the moment.

But Lumbie Mlambo says that’s a good time to take a step back. Everyone has the potential to shine in life’s darkest moments, but the key to achieving goals and an overall better existence is to maintain a balance so that one aspect of your life isn’t consumed by another.

While some people might say balance in life is an impossible goal, she disagrees and says when each of us find our equilibrium, we become more productive and a greater asset to our communities.

“There’s balance in everything we do, be it walking, talking, eating, sleeping, working or spending time with family,” says Mlambo, editor of Equanimity Magazine (www.equanimitymag.com), an online publication that features inspiring stories of life and success.

“For example, look at how we try to deal with our work-life situation. We balance our workload so that we can still make room for other activities, to spend more time with our spouses or our children. We do that because we understand how important it is.”

She offers these reasons for why living a balanced life is essential.

•  The health factor. Staying balanced is a key to a healthier and successful life. Both mental health and physical health benefit, and as a result, so do our overall lives. “When we’re healthy, we’re able to care for ourselves and others in our community,” Mlambo says.

•  The empathy factor. When we find balance in life, we can better understand the importance of helping the underprivileged, says Mlambo, who grew up in a rural area in Zimbabwe. You begin to realize that someday you could be in their situation, which makes you a more empathetic person. “Your economic situation is like your health,” she says. “Nothing is guaranteed.”

•  The role-model factor. Sharing our stories – whether it’s a tale of success or even a tale of failure – is important because others can learn from us or be inspired by us as they too strive for a balanced life. “When you tell your story, it empowers, motivates and encourages people to not give up on their dreams and goals,” Mlambo says. “Maybe you think your story is just not that interesting or important. But for someone out there, it may be the spark that ignites them to great things.”

Mlambo always strove to find balance in her life. But she became even more passionate about it after she suffered a stroke in 2001 that left her partially paralyzed. She since has recovered, but says the event had a profound impact on her and she will always consider herself a stroke patient.

“Before the stroke, I thought my life was balanced in a way,” she says. “I mean, I ate healthy foods. I exercised seven days a week. But it was not balanced in the way I wanted. I had been too focused on myself. I realized that life was not just about me, but about others.”

Finding balance in life isn’t just a feel-good concept, Mlambo says. As people achieve balance, they realize they have the potential to rise above their circumstances. They can become more productive in their communities and that is good for everyone.

“Staying proactive and shifting the way we think can even help the economy to grow and can help create more jobs,” she says.

Certainly, maintaining a balanced life may be tougher than ever because technology allows work – emails, text messages, telephone calls – to intrude on people’s “off” hours. But that’s just all the more reason to make a concerted effort to strive for balance, Mlambo says.

She says it’s become popular in some circles to argue that a balanced life is a myth and can’t be achieved. But regardless of their views, she says, most people seem to be trying to bring balance to their lives, even if they don’t think of it that way.

“We eat healthy to stay balanced, we get enough sleep or rest to avoid stress, we juggle our daily activities to stay balanced,” Mlambo says. “To be successful in anything we do, we must have some sort of balance.”

About Lumbie Mlambo

lumbieLumbie Mlambo is editor of Equanimity Magazine (www.equanimitymag.com), a lifestyle publication that shares the stories of “real people and their search to lead better lives.” She also has a background in project management, computer/software engineering and business analysis. She holds an associate degree in computer science from Indiana University South Bend; and a bachelor’s degree in computer science and mathematics from Texas Woman’s University. She is multilingual, speaking English, Zulu, Ndebele and French.

Book Review: Wheat Belly Total Health by William Davis

Putting Iron In Your Fire And Other Ways
To Improve Your Health

Grains Cause Deficiencies, But All Is Not Lost, Says Cardiologist

Wheat and other grains are such staples of human diets that people refer to sharing a meal as “breaking bread.”

But it’s more likely that the bread is breaking us, even the whole-grain versions, says cardiologist Dr. William Davis.

Among other problems, the consumption of wheat and other grains can lead to significant nutrient and vitamin deficiencies, putting people’s health at risk, says Davis, author of “Wheat Belly Total Health,” (www.wheatbellyblog.com), the latest in his bestselling “Wheat Belly” series.

“People are always told to replace their white-flour products with whole-grain products as a path to better nutrition,” he says. “But that’s just replacing something bad for you with something less bad.”

Here are three examples of nutritional deficiencies that Davis says a grain-rich diet can cause, along with ways to restore the nutrients to your body.

•  Iron in your fire. Feeling lightheaded and low on energy? Finding it hard to maintain your concentration? That could mean an iron deficiency. Blood loss is a more common cause of iron deficiency, but grain consumption isn’t far behind, Davis says. Remove grains from the diet and normal iron absorption will return. That may be all that’s required, he says, though in some cases iron supplements are needed to speed up the process.

Eggs and meats are among the best sources of iron. Other iron-rich foods include spinach, chard, kale, molasses, pumpkin seeds, lima beans and kidney beans.

•  In the pink with zinc. Grain-consuming people might find themselves suffering from skin rashes, distortions of taste, unexplained diarrhea, wounds that heal slowly and other chronic health problems. If you have a zinc deficiency, don’t feel singled out. So does about 25 percent world’s population. Davis says that’s because grains have a compound called phytates that block zinc absorption dramatically. The solution? Don’t eat grains, but eat zinc-rich foods such as meat, poultry and shellfish. If you can’t fill up on zinc-rich meats, nutritional supplements such as zinc gluconate, zinc sulfate and zinc acetate can help, he says.

•  The magnificence of magnesium. Magnesium deficiency has real health implications, Davis says, and a diet rich in “healthy whole grains” virtually assures a deficiency. A lack of magnesium contributes to osteoporosis, and also is associated with hypertension, higher blood sugars, muscle cramps, low birth weight in infants, migraine headaches and heart rhythm disorders. Increasing your consumption of magnesium-rich foods can help. They include almonds and other nuts, peanut butter, spinach, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds and sunflower seeds.

“One thing you do not have to do is correct deficiencies that develop as a consequence of eliminating grains,” Davis says. “There is no such deficiency. In fact, the opposite is often true. Nutrient status improves without the nutrient-blocking effects of grains.”

About Dr. William Davis

William Davis, MD is a cardiologist and author of several books that have sold nearly 3 million copies, including the No.1 New York Times bestseller “Wheat Belly.” He has appeared on major national media including the Dr. Oz Show, CBS This Morning and National Public Radio. Davis has built a substantial online presence on his Wheat Belly Blog, (www.wheatbellyblog.com), with more than 300,000 visits per month. He is a graduate of the St. Louis University School of Medicine, with training in internal medicine and cardiovascular disease at the Ohio State University Hospitals. He also had advanced training in angioplasty at Case Western Reserve University Hospitals, where he served as Director of the Cardiovascular Fellowship and Assistant Professor of Medicine.

Amazon Review

5 StarsHow Do You Follow Up A Classic Health Book? Write Another One!

reviewed by Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Man 

By this point, I’d find it hard to believe that there’s anyone who hasn’t at least heard of Milwaukee, WI-based cardiologist Dr. William Davis’ runaway New York Times bestselling book released in 2011 called Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health. That singular book has played such an instrumental role in combating the message we continually hear from so-called health experts about the need to consume more “healthy whole grains” in our diet and people are waking up to the truth about how grains are destroying their health. Even those who aren’t as deeply ingrained (all pun intended!) in the health community are aware of the powerful message Dr. Davis shared about in that book that is still having a major impact and touching the lives of countless numbers of people with more than a million copies of that instant classic in print and counting. But now he’s back with even more compelling information that is sure to become a classic as well.

In his long-awaited 2014 follow-up book WHEAT BELLY TOTAL HEALTH, Dr. Davis applauds those who were able to successfully remove the wheat from their diet, but now encourages them to extend that dietary abstention to ALL grains and even most carbohydrates that are wreaking the most havoc on their health. That doesn’t mean a no-carb diet (as the biased media likes to describe it), but rather a customized plan tailored towards the individual to figure out what level of the appropriate kinds of carbohydrates is right for them to keep their metabolic and hormonal health markers in check. And guess what? That’s going to be different from person to person which is why this book shows you what things to be on the lookout for in your pursuit of optimizing your health. The idea that we are all a bunch of robots who need the exact same nutritional approach to health is long gone.

So what do you get from this new book that Dr. Davis didn’t already share in WHEAT BELLY? Plenty! The book is broken up into three major parts:

Part 1: Dr. Davis explains the problem with consuming any grains in your diet (it’s a far different grain today than it was in Biblical times), the unique and damaging role (to both the cows and the humans who consume the meat from those cows) that grains have played in “fattening” up the cattle, and why we should be gravitating towards making humanely-raised, grass-fed, grain-free cows and other animals as the primary sources of our healthy nutritional plan.

Part 2: You’ll learn why going grain-free is more than just about getting rid of the belly, but rather about putting your health in the best possible position it can be. You get very practical advice on how to make this transition as smoothly as possible with tricks and tips that have helped so many of Dr. Davis’ patients and readers. And expanding up what his neurologist colleague Dr. David Perlmutter shared in his 2013 New York Times bestselling book Grain Brain, Dr. Davis gives all the preventative measures in dealing with such neurodegenerative diseases as seizures, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease and well as many other quality of life issues. They’re all related to nutrition which will be revelation to so many who read this book.

Part 3: This is where you get to the really good stuff in this book because you’ll learn about the kind of damage all those years of consuming grains have had on your health and Dr. Davis helps you overcome and fully recover from what he describes as “Post-Traumatic Grain Gut Syndrome.” When you do that, he explains the powerful therapeutic impact that will play on key blood health markers like cholesterol, blood sugar, inflammation and more. It’s in this section that you learn about other things that can impact weight and health, including thyroid, endocrine function, autoimmune disease, and more. Plus, you won’t want to miss what Dr. Davis has to share about those of you who are doing all the right things and yet you aren’t seeing the weight come off (this chapter alone is worth the price of admission!).

Dr. Davis is one of the most articulate, smack-you-in-your-face-with-the-truth, and truly witty health personalities of our day and WHEAT BELLY TOTAL HEALTH puts that on full display for all the world to see. Reading through this book, I could tell the passion that Dr. Davis has for this subject is stronger than it’s ever been before. He really stepped up his game to another level this time around with a bit more pep in his step as well as a greater sense of urgency than he did in WHEAT BELLY. The time is NOW to absorb information that is going to change your life and that’s exactly what you’ll get in this book.

Get Serious about Your Health

Salt is Good for You, Calcium Supplements are Bad,
and the Lab Test Everyone Should Get

4 Tips for Getting Seriously Healthy from One of the
‘Best Doctors in America’*

There’s a reason – well, several – why so many diseases are increasing in frequency in the United States, making some that were almost unheard of 100 years ago commonplace today, says Robert Thompson, M.D., an OB/GYN and integrative medicine specialist deemed by his peers to be in the top 5 percent of U.S. physicians.

“The United States is now 46th in men’s mortality and the absolute worst country in the industrialized world for first-day infant mortality,” says Thompson, author of “The Calcium Lie II: What Your Doctor Still Doesn’t Know,” (calciumliebook.com), a new book that details the roles minerals play in overall health and how to identify and correct deficiencies and imbalances.

“Based on the current rate of autism diagnoses, there will be no ‘normal’ male babies born in the U.S. by 2030,” he says. “The current rate of diabetes suggests 95 percent of our adult population will be diabetic by 2030. The number of children with life-threatening allergies has increased more than 1,000 percent since 1995.”

A perfect storm of corporate power, profits and public misinformation has succeeded in overwhelming the basic biochemical and physiological tenets of good health, says Thompson, who published his first book, “The Calcium Lie: What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know Could Kill You,” in 2008.

“Mineral deficiencies are responsible for a host of health problems, which are incorrectly treated by drugs,” Thompson says. “We’re told by the government and the medical community that we should be ingesting certain amounts of vitamin and mineral supplements to prevent disease, like osteoporosis, when in reality, the recommendations lead to other very serious health problems.”

Thompson offers these suggestions for Americans to take charge of their health:

•  Get a hair tissue mineral analysis (HTMA) to determine your mineral status.
This may be the most important health test that exists, Thompson says. Only when you and your doctor know for sure your mineral status and important ratios can you adapt your diet, minerals and supplements to work toward proper balance.

Thompson recommends using Trace Elements, Inc. clinical lab in Addison, Texas, because it adheres to the highest standards. The lab accepts only samples submitted by health-care providers, including physicians, nutritionists, and others, so you need to find one who does HTMA and uses that lab. (Individuals who can’t find a provider can call the lab for help in locating one; HTMA is prohibited in New York state.)

•  Do not take calcium supplements unless tests indicate a deficiency.We’ve all been told that we must ingest lots of calcium to ensure strong bones. In fact, calcium is just one of at least 12 minerals in our bones, all of which must be present in the right balance for good bone health. Calcium has been added to so much of our food, it’s unlikely most of us are deficient. And yet, people are told to take calcium supplements. Excess calcium can cause kidney and gallstones, arterial plaque, bone spurs, calcium deposits in tissues other than bone, and brain cell dysfunction, brain shrinkage and dementia. Instead of calcium, Thompson instructs all his patients and readers to take a minimum of 3 grams of trace minerals derived from sea salt every day.

•  Salt – sodium – is necessary for digestion, nutrient absorption, cell function and metabolism.
Limiting salt intake is not only the wrong advice for 90 percent of the people at risk for high blood pressure, it also contributes to the lack of minerals in our bodies. Many of us are actually deficient in sodium.

Salt is a mineral, and unrefined sea salt and rock salt is the best source of sodium and ionic minerals. If you are sodium deficient, add harvested pure sea salt liberally to your foods. It is important to use pure sea salt, and not the common table salt, as processing has stripped common table salt of its mineral value.

•  Use only vitamin supplements made from 100 percent organic whole foods that have been vine-ripened.
Almost all of us need supplements because contemporary food supplies lack adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals, thanks to soil depletion. Most store-bought vitamins include just one component of the many complex molecular elements contained in the naturally occurring vitamin source. You need all of the nutrient components to get the full benefits.

The best natural sources of readily available vitamins include raw seeds, stabilized rice bran powder, vine-ripened fresh fruit and berries (vitamin C).

 *Robert Thompson, M.D., was added to the peer-reviewed directory, “Best Doctors in America,” in 1996.

About Robert Thompson, M.D.

Dr. Robert Thompson is a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist, and a nutrition specialist who helps patients get long-term relief from chronic disease, including obesity, diabetes, hypothyroidism and adrenal fatigue. His newest book, “The Calcium Lie II,” is available for free at calciumliebook.com. Dr. Thompson received his medical training at the University of Kentucky and has been a leader in medical advances for more than 30 years.

Book Review & Bonus Recipes: Wheat Belly by Dr. William Davis

Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back To Health

by William Davis (Author), Tom Weiner (Narrator)

 

Review

‘Fascinating, compelling, and more than a little entertaining, Wheat Belly may be the most important health book of the year.’ Dana Carpender, author of 500 Low-Carb Recipes ‘Comprehensive, readable and witty… Take [Dr Davis’] advice to lose wheat from your diet and you’ll likely be paid back many times over in the form of a slimmer, healthier body and a better functioning brain.’ Dr. John Briffa BSc MB BS nutritional physician and author of Waist Disposal.

~~~~~

Physician Advises: Skip the Grains But Not
the Treats This Holiday Season

Best-Selling Author Shares 2 Grain-Free Recipes

At a time when we most want to look and feel our best, we seem to do everything possible to ensure we don’t, says cardiologist Dr. William Davis.

“The weather starts to change and we reach for the pumpkin-spice cookies, cider doughnuts and beer, which launches us into processed carbohydrates season,” says Dr. Davis, author of “Wheat Belly Total Health,” (www.wheatbellyblog.com), the latest in his bestselling “Wheat Belly” series.

“They make us tired and sluggish when we especially need energy as we prepare for all the fun stuff and preparation that lead up to Thanksgiving, Christmas and Hannukah, and they cause us to gain weight, which we immediately pledge to shed come New Year’s.”  

People have been taught that the refined, processed carbohydrates in foods like white rice, white bread and traditionally baked goods are “bad carbs.” We’re told we’ll be healthier, happier and slimmer if we get stick to the “good carbs” in fruits, nuts and whole grains.

Not true, Dr. Davis says – at least in the case of grains.

“Grasses and grains like wheat are a great food source for goats, cows and the like,” he says. “But humans have a different digestive process and different nutritional needs. Grasses are not only responsible for unwanted weight gain, but also more serious conditions, including Crohn’s disease and other autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. We just weren’t meant to eat them.”

That doesn’t mean you have to do without your favorite treats during the holidays. Just make them a different way.

He offers these recipes:

•  Pumpkin Spice Muffins (makes 12):
2 cups ground almonds
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/4 cup ground golden flaxseed
Sweetener such as Truvia or stevia extract equivalent to 3/4 cup sucrose
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground allspice
1 teaspoon grated nutmeg
1 teaspoon baking powder
Dash of fine sea salt
1 can (15 ounces) unsweetened pumpkin puree
1/2 cup sour cream or canned coconut milk
2 large eggs
1/4 cup walnut oil
melted coconut oil or extra-light olive oil.

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Grease a 12-cup muffin tin. Stir together the almond meal, walnuts, flaxseed, sweetener, cinnamon, allspice, nutmeg, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl. Stir together the pumpkin, sour cream or coconut milk, eggs, and oil in another large bowl. Stir the pumpkin mixture into the almond meal mixture and mix thoroughly. Spoon the batter into the muffin cups, filling them about half full. Bake until a toothpick inserted in a muffin comes out dry, about 45 minutes. Cool the muffins in the pans 10 to 15 minutes, then turn out onto a rack to cool completely.

•  Wheat-free Cauliflower Mushroom Dressing:
1 ounce dried porcini mushrooms
1 pound loose ground pork sausage
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
2 stalks celery, chopped
1 medium onion, diced
1 head cauliflower
1 green pepper, chopped
4-ounce can/jar roasted red peppers
8 ounces Portabella mushrooms, sliced
2 tablespoons ground golden flaxseed
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon ground sage
1 teaspoon ground thyme
1 teaspoon ground tarragon
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Bring approximately 12 ounces water to a boil in sauce pan. Toss in porcini mushrooms and turn heat down to maintain below boiling. Stir every couple of minutes for 20 minutes. In deep sauce pan, sauté sausage in 1 tablespoon olive oil, along with celery and onions, until sausage is cooked. Drain excess oil. Place saucepan back on low heat. Break cauliflower into small florets and add to sausage mix. Toss in drained porcini mushrooms along with approximately 4 ounces of the porcini broth, remainder of olive oil, green pepper, roasted red peppers, Portabella mushrooms and flaxseed. Add onion powder, sage, thyme, tarragon, salt and black pepper and stir. Transfer to baking dish and place in oven. Bake for 45 minutes.

About Dr. William Davis

William Davis, MD is a cardiologist and author of several books that have sold more than 2 million copies, including the No.1 New York Times bestseller “Wheat Belly.” He has appeared on major national media including the Dr. Oz Show, CBS This Morning, National Public Radio, and Live! with Kelly.. Davis has built a substantial online presence on his Wheat Belly Blog, (www.wheatbellyblog.com), with more than 300,000 visits per month. He is a graduate of the St. Louis University School of Medicine, with training in internal medicine and cardiovascular disease at the Ohio State University Hospitals. A Case Western Reserve University Hospitals, he served as Director of the Cardiovascular Fellowship and Assistant Professor of Medicine.  

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Staying Healthy During the Holidays

Why are the Holidays So Hazardous to Our Health?
Physician Shares Tips for Giving Your Body What It Needs
to Fight Illness

It’s a sad statistical fact: The holidays, from Christmas to New Year’s, are a treacherous time when it comes to our health.

“There’s a spike in heart attacks and other cardiac issues,” says Dr. John Young, a physician specializing in the treatment of chronic illnesses through biochemical, physiological and nutraceutical technologies, and the author of “Beyond Treatment: Discover how to build a cellular foundation to achieve optimal health,”www.YoungHealth.com.

“The incidence of pneumonia cases spikes – in both cold and warm climates. And deaths from natural causes spike. In fact, more people die of natural causes on Christmas Day than any other day of the year!”

While those numbers are well-documented, the cause(s) are not.

“Stress plays a role, particularly if your immune system is weakened,” Dr. Young says. “If you look at how most of us eat from Halloween through New Year’s, it’s easy to see how the immune system takes a beating and otherwise healthy people become more susceptible to illness during the holidays.”

It’s basic biochemistry, he says.

“We eat a lot more refined sugar, for instance, which is a carbohydrate that’s been stripped of all the vitamins, minerals and proteins that make up a complete carbohydrate,” he says. “Our bodies can’t use that, so the cells in our digestive organs work overtime, burning up a lot of energy, vitamins and minerals to digest it, and they get nothing back. So, eventually, they grow weak.”

So – can we have a little sugar, and good health, too? Dr. Young says we can.

“The occasional slice of pumpkin pie is fine as long as you’re also feeding your cells with the nutrients they need – the minerals, vitamins, good quality protein, amino acids, essential fatty acids – to stay healthy.”
He offers these tips for staying healthy through the holidays and throughout the year.

•  Get your vitamin D!
Vitamin D is actually a hormone, not a vitamin, and one of our best sources for it is sunshine. Unfortunately, many people work indoors all day, so they get little sun exposure. When they do go outside, they wear long sleeves and sunblock to protect against skin cancer. And, of course, in the wintertime, people in cold climes tend to stay inside. As a result, many of us are vitamin D deficient, and should be taking supplements.

“Vitamin D is crucial to many physiological systems, including our immune defenses,” Dr. Young says. “It helps fight bacterial and viral infections, including the flu. It supports our cardiovascular system; optimal vitamin D levels can reduce hypertension, heart attacks and stroke.

“If I feel I’m coming down with a cold, I’ll take 40,000 units of vitamin D at bedtime,” he says. “The next morning, I usually feel like a new person.”

•  Eat your protein – 1 gram for every 2.2 pounds of body weight daily.
In this country, we think a healthy diet means eating a lot of fruits and vegetables. We’ve forgotten protein, Dr. Young says.

“Our immune system is made up of proteins – our bones are 40 percent protein,” he says. “We need protein.”

When calculating your protein intake, consider: an egg has about 8 grams, and 8 ounces of fish, chicken, beef or pork have about 30 grams.

Dr. Young does not give any of his patients more than 100 grams of protein a day.

•  Get a good night’s sleep, exercise, and manage your stress.
Yup, some doctors’ orders never change. Rest, exercise and finding effective, healthy ways to cope with stress are simple ways to pamper your cells.

 “One of the many cellular benefits of exercise is that it increases the oxygen in our bloodstream. Every cell in our body requires oxygen, so consider exercise another means of feeding your cells.”

It’s also important to manage stress during the holidays. With unchecked stress, our body releases large amounts of cortisol which, among other things, suppresses the immune system.

“Take time out to meditate, listen to music, or take a walk in the woods,” Dr. Young says. “It feels good – and it’s good for you!”

About John Young, M.D.

Dr. John Young, (www.YoungHealth.com), is a medical doctor with more than 15 years’ experience working in emergency rooms and pediatric burn units. He’s the medical director of Young Foundational Health Center, specializing in treating patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes by addressing the physiological issues and not just the symptoms. He’s also medical director of Young Health Products, which incorporate the latest biochemical, physiological and Nobel Prize-winning protocols for optimal cellular nutrition. Dr. Young is the author of “Beyond Treatment.” He takes questions via a call-in conference call every Tuesday at 8:30 p.m. Eastern time. Call (760) 569-7676, access code 772967.

Staying Healthy During the Holidays

 

Why are the Holidays So Hazardous to Our Health?
Physician Shares Tips for Giving Your Body What It Needs
to Fight Illness

It’s a sad statistical fact: The holidays, from Christmas to New Year’s, are a treacherous time when it comes to our health.

“There’s a spike in heart attacks and other cardiac issues,” says Dr. John Young, a physician specializing in the treatment of chronic illnesses through biochemical, physiological and nutraceutical technologies, and the author of “Beyond Treatment: Discover how to build a cellular foundation to achieve optimal health,” www.YoungHealth.com.

“The incidence of pneumonia cases spikes – in both cold and warm climates. And deaths from natural causes spike. In fact, more people die of natural causes on Christmas Day than any other day of the year!”

While those numbers are well-documented, the cause(s) are not.

“Stress plays a role, particularly if your immune system is weakened,” Dr. Young says. “If you look at how most of us eat from Halloween through New Year’s, it’s easy to see how the immune system takes a beating and otherwise healthy people become more susceptible to illness during the holidays.”

It’s basic biochemistry, he says.

“We eat a lot more refined sugar, for instance, which is a carbohydrate that’s been stripped of all the vitamins, minerals and proteins that make up a complete carbohydrate,” he says. “Our bodies can’t use that, so the cells in our digestive organs work overtime, burning up a lot of energy, vitamins and minerals to digest it, and they get nothing back. So, eventually, they grow weak.”

So – can we have a little sugar, and good health, too? Dr. Young says we can.

“The occasional slice of pumpkin pie is fine as long as you’re also feeding your cells with the nutrients they need – the minerals, vitamins, good quality protein, amino acids, essential fatty acids – to stay healthy.”
He offers these tips for staying healthy through the holidays and throughout the year.

•  Get your vitamin D!
Vitamin D is actually a hormone, not a vitamin, and one of our best sources for it is sunshine. Unfortunately, many people work indoors all day, so they get little sun exposure. When they do go outside, they wear long sleeves and sunblock to protect against skin cancer. And, of course, in the wintertime, people in cold climes tend to stay inside. As a result, many of us are vitamin D deficient, and should be taking supplements.

“Vitamin D is crucial to many physiological systems, including our immune defenses,” Dr. Young says. “It helps fight bacterial and viral infections, including the flu. It supports our cardiovascular system; optimal vitamin D levels can reduce hypertension, heart attacks and stroke.

“If I feel I’m coming down with a cold, I’ll take 40,000 units of vitamin D at bedtime,” he says. “The next morning, I usually feel like a new person.”

•  Eat your protein – 1 gram for every 2.2 pounds of body weight daily.
In this country, we think a healthy diet means eating a lot of fruits and vegetables. We’ve forgotten protein, Dr. Young says.

“Our immune system is made up of proteins – our bones are 40 percent protein,” he says. “We need protein.”

When calculating your protein intake, consider: an egg has about 8 grams, and 8 ounces of fish, chicken, beef or pork have about 30 grams.

Dr. Young does not give any of his patients more than 100 grams of protein a day.

•  Get a good night’s sleep, exercise, and manage your stress.
Yup, some doctors’ orders never change. Rest, exercise and finding effective, healthy ways to cope with stress are simple ways to pamper your cells.

 “One of the many cellular benefits of exercise is that it increases the oxygen in our bloodstream. Every cell in our body requires oxygen, so consider exercise another means of feeding your cells.”

It’s also important to manage stress during the holidays. With unchecked stress, our body releases large amounts of cortisol which, among other things, suppresses the immune system.

“Take time out to meditate, listen to music, or take a walk in the woods,” Dr. Young says. “It feels good – and it’s good for you!”

About John Young, M.D.

Dr. John Young, (www.YoungHealth.com), is a medical doctor with more than 15 years’ experience working in emergency rooms and pediatric burn units. He’s the medical director of Young Foundational Health Center, specializing in treating patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes by addressing the physiological issues and not just the symptoms. He’s also medical director of Young Health Products, which incorporate the latest biochemical, physiological and Nobel Prize-winning protocols for optimal cellular nutrition. Dr. Young is the author of “Beyond Treatment.” He takes questions via a call-in conference call every Tuesday at 8:30 p.m. Eastern time. Call (760) 569-7676, access code 772967.

 

 

A Member of my Family is in URGENT Need of a Kidney Transplant!

Many years ago Del was diagnosed with Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) a genetic disorder characterized by the growth of numerous cysts in the kidneys. In 1968 Del lost a kidney to PKD and has been managing for the past 46 years with his remaining kidney. Recently his condition has worsened, the enlarging cysts are severely impacting the function of this kidney and it is failing. Del has been told he requires a kidney transplant as soon as possible. His best chances are a kidney from a living donor. Recipients of a living donor kidney live longer and healthier lives.

Time is of the essence so we are reaching out to as many people as we can to alert them to Del’s critical condition. You can make a difference. Please help spread the word to your family members, friends, co-workers, or any groups you are affiliated with. The more people we reach the greater the probability we can find a suitable kidney match for Del.

If you or anyone you know is willing to be tested to see if you are a compatible match for donation please contact Robert Wood Johnson Transplant Center, New Brunswick, NJ at (732) 253-3699 or 1-877-NUKIDNEY and follow the prompts for the living donor program. Tell them you are calling on behalf of Del Du-Bois.

Thank you so much,
Barbara Cordero Du-Bois and family

 

 

Some facts :

– We are born with 2 kidneys but can survive with one.

– Polycystic Kidney Disease is a genetic disorder so family members can be affected and are not good donor candidates.

– People with the most common type of PKD progress to kidney failure also called end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

– Living donor transplants represent the best opportunity for a positive long-term outcome.

– Transplants from a live donor has the benefit of lasting twice as long as a kidney from a deceased donor.

– The wait for a deceased donor could take 5 to 7 or more years.

– While the number of people requiring a kidney transplant has been increasing each year, the number of transplants received has remained at a stable and alarmingly low level over the years.

– According to the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse there are 101,047 individuals awaiting a kidney as of August 21, 2014 and since January to May of this year 11,845 people who received transplants of which 2,280 came from live donors.

 

Summer’s Over – Back to Our Busy Lives

How to Recover Like a Younger You
Remember Your 20s? Food Science Expert Shares
 5 Nutrients That Help You Feel Younger

While barbecues, sports leagues, family vacations, days at the beach and nights out with friends are fun, keeping up with summer recreation while maintaining a steady work schedule can be challenging, says Budge Collinson.

And before we know it, we’ll be back into the busy fall grind, getting kids up and off to school, participating in clubs and civic groups that have been on summer hiatus, and yes, before we know it, planning for holidays!

“We like to tell ourselves that there will be a period of rest before the next big thing, but usually there isn’t,” says Collinson, a food science expert with a passion for health and fitness. “The truth is, most of us like having full and often fast-paced lives, even if we tend to get worn out more quickly as we get older.” 

Don’t resort to caffeine and other stimulants for a temporary energy boost, Collinson says.

“Replacing the nutrients that are depleted when you’re active is a much smarter way to maintain or increase your energy level, and many of those nutrients have long-term benefits as well,” says Collinson, who formulated an effervescent, natural multivitamin beverage called Youth Infusion, (www.drinkyouthinfusion.com), to make it easier to get all the essential nutrients and minerals in one 6-ounce drink.

He discusses the revitalizing powers of specific nutrients:

•  CoQ10 for that extra energy boost. Every cell in your body uses CoQ10 to produce energy, but your heart needs it the most. CoQ10 can help balance your blood pressure, and its powerful antioxidant properties help protect you against pre-mature aging.

•  Arginine to help with your endurance during workouts and your daily routine. Arginine helps the cardiovascular system by assisting in nitric oxide production, making the arteries more elastic. It also supports the functioning of your hormones and immune system, helps kidneys remove the body’s waste and promotes wound healing.

•  Theanine helps support better moods. Theanine is a calming extract of green tea. Clinical research indicates that it helps focus a distracted mind. To a lesser extent, theanine has also been shown to reduce anxiety.

•  Resveratrol: a versatile antioxidant for general well-being and long-term peace of mind. Resveratrol promotes healthy circulation, prevents cholesterol oxidation and protects your entire cardiovascular system from the effects of dangerous free radicals. Initial research shows resveratrol helps defend the body against a number of diseases, including Alzheimer’s, heart disease, cancer and diabetes.

•  Vitamin D – for when the sun isn’t as bright as it was during summer. Up to 90 percent of the vitamin D the body needs comes from sunlight, which is in much shorter supply after summer. Vitamin D is required for the regulation of the calcium and phosphorus in the body. It also plays an important role in maintaining proper bone structure and supporting immunity.

About Budge Collinson

Budge Collinson was the beneficiary of his mother’s natural health formula as a sick baby, which led to a deep interest in health and wellness at a young age. After years of research and seeing the growing demand for natural products with clinical support, he founded Infusion Sciences,www.infusionsciences.com. Collinson earned a bachelor’s degree in food and resource economics from the University of Florida and certification from the National Academy of Sports Medicine. Recently, he became a member of the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine and consistently attends the Natural Products Expo, where he learns the latest science and news about nutritious ingredients. Collinson is also a go-to source for media outlets across the country for healthy lifestyle and food source discussions.

Tips for Feeling Better

3 Simple Things You Can Do Today
to Feel Better Tomorrow

Doctor Outlines Easy Changes That Can Vastly
Improve Health, Happiness and Well-Being

“Imagine you’re a spider with just one leg,” says Dr. Frank King.

“You put forth immense effort to try to haul yourself around and not only does it wear you out, it’s frustrating and you don’t get far.” King is a chiropractor and doctor of naturopathy specializing in homeopathic remedies, and author of The Healing Revolution (www.kingbio.com).

“It gets a bit easier with two legs and easier still with four legs. But it’s not till you have all eight legs that you can really dance.”

Dr. King explains that the eight legs represent Eight Essentials we need for optimum mental, physical and spiritual health: Empowering your human spirit; Water; Nutrition; Fitness; Sleep; Nature; Relationships; and Hands On Techniques (touch).

“It would be overwhelming and self-defeating to look at all eight areas and think, ‘I have to make significant changes in every area immediately!” Dr. King says. “You don’t have to and who could? I know from my experience with countless patients and friends, and even in my own life, that you can see immediate results by making a few small changes at a time.”

Dr. King describes three that are easy to make and will have you feeling better quickly.

•  Drink half your body weight in ounces of spring or well water every day.
If you weigh 150 pounds, that’s 75 ounces of water (about 9 cups).

“Many of us walk around dehydrated without realizing it and that can have a significant effect on our health and how we feel,” Dr. King says. Dehydrated bodies trap toxins and encourage water retention – a natural defense against the chronic “drought.”

“Our bodies need the steady flow of pure, spring or well water. If you don’t like the taste, try mixing up to a teaspoon of sea salt into a quart of water,” he says.

A simple test for dehydration: Pinch the skin on the back of your hand and hold for three seconds. When you release, if the ridge from the pinch remains for more than a second, you’re probably dehydrated.

•  Take at least a few minutes every day to connect with nature. Nature brings perpetual revitalization and ongoing renewal, especially when experienced through multiple senses:  the smell of freshly turned earth or evergreens in the woods; the touch of cool stream water on your face or feet; the sight of birds on the wing and budding blooms.

“These are not just pleasant little gifts to experience – we need them for restoration, renewal, revival and rehabilitation,” Dr. King says. “The more disconnected we become from the Earth, the more we inhibit our body’s natural ability to heal.”

•  Take a brisk, 10- to 20-minute walk every day. Walking is the simplest, most natural form of exercise. You might walk a nature trail, walk to the store instead of driving or take your pet for a stroll.

“Three brisk 10-minute walks a day are as effective at lowering blood pressure as one 30-minute walk,” Dr. King says, citing an Arizona State University study.

“Outdoor walking is preferable to walking on a treadmill or other machine, since the uneven surfaces and changing directions of natural walking will engage more muscles and tendons.”

Swing each arm in synchronization with the opposite foot to strengthen your cross-crawl functionality and mind-body balance.

About Dr. Frank King

Dr. Frank King is a chiropractor, doctor of naturopathy, and founder and president of King Bio, an FDA-registered pharmaceutical manufacturing company dedicated to education, research, development, manufacture and distribution of safe and natural homeopathic medicines for people and pets. Dr. King is also the author of, The Healing Revolution: Eight Essentials to Awaken Abundant Life Naturally!(www.kingbio.com). A fourth-generation farmer, Dr. King raises yak, camel, boar, wisent and American bison sold under the Carolina Bison brand. He is a member of the Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia Convention of the United States.