Book Review: Hurricane Katrina: The Story of the Most Destructive Hurricane in American History

Hurricane Katrina:
The Story of the Most Destructive
Hurricane in American History

“The big lesson I learned from Hurricane Katrina is that we have to be thinking about the unthinkable because sometimes the unthinkable happens.” – Mike Leavitt

Hurricanes have been devastating communities for thousands of years, bringing about various combinations of rain and wind that can do everything from taking down some dead limbs to wiping out houses. They are also common enough that people who live for any length of time in a region prone to having hurricanes are inclined to accept them as something of a periodic nuisance rather than a serious danger. Modern construction styles allow houses to withstand winds in excess of 100 miles an hour, and early warning systems allow people to evacuate. Thus, most hurricanes of the 21st century take fewer lives than a serious highway accident.

As a result, the world watched in horror as Hurricane Katrina decimated New Orleans in August 2005, and the calamity seemed all the worse because many felt that technology had advanced far enough to prevent such tragedies, whether through advanced warning or engineering. Spawning off the Bahamian coast that month, Katrina quickly grew to be one of the deadliest natural disasters in American history, killing more than 1,800 people and flooding a heavy majority of one of America’s most famous cities. At first, the storm seemed to be harmless, scooting across the Floridian coast as a barely noticeable Category 1 storm, but when Katrina reached the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, its winds grew exponentially before slamming into the southern Louisiana coast as a massive Category 5 hurricane.

In addition to the deadly nature of the hurricane, it was also incredibly destructive as a result of failed levees around the New Orleans area. By the time the storm had passed, it had wreaked an estimated $108 billion of damage across the region, and the human suffering, with nearly 2,000 deaths and a million people displaced, was available for viewing across the world. Naturally, the reactions of political leaders would be heavily scrutinized in the aftermath, and people studied the lessons to be learned from the disaster to prevent a similar occurrence in the future.

Hurricane Katrina: The Story of the Most Destructive Hurricane in American History chronicles the storm from its formation to the devastating effects it had across the Gulf of Mexico. Along with pictures and a bibliography, you will learn about Hurricane Katrina like never before, in no time at all.

*Includes pictures
*Includes accounts of the hurricane written by survivors
*Includes a bibliography for further reading
*Includes a table of contents

Amazon Buy Link
Kindle Print Audio

Amazon Customer Reviews

Terrific book reviewed by Critters
I really learned a lot from this book, even though I well remember Hurricane Katrina. The graphics are just superb, and I understand more about the levees now (although I’ll never understand why a city would be built below sea level)…

Stormy Review by Rivers Books
Amazing overview of this storm and the damage it did. The personal stories of the victims give it a human touch.

EXCELLENT by Baarda
HURRICANE KATRINA destroyed New Orleans. Destruction that has not and will be not be repaired. Climate change assures that the future of New Orleans is not good.

Charles River Editors is a digital publishing company that creates compelling, educational content. In addition to publishing original titles, we help clients create traditional and media-enhanced books.

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